Weekly Comic Round-Up, September 25, 2013 Edition

by Aaron Einhorn
Welcome back! If you’ve followed me here from Comic Hero News, or going even farther back to Underneath My Mask, than you probably remember that one of the regular features I had was a review of the comics I’m reading that week. Full disclosure: This is not everything I read, and it’s not everything that hit the stands this week. It is, however, the books I feel merit being talked about, either because they were awesome or because there was something really, really wrong with them.

So, here we go. What came home with me from The Laughing Ogre? Read on.

ax12_c01A+X #12
Do you remember a time when comics were fun? I mean, really, seriously, fun? If you’re a younger comic reader, the answer may be “No,” but I assure you that it existed. A+X has consistently been a throwback to those days, and this particular issue shows how you can keep comics fun, but at the same time, let serious storylines still matter.

The first part brings The Beast and Wonder Man together. These two were incredible friends in the 80s era of the Avengers, when both were light-hearted, somewhat silly characters. These same two characters have now gone on to become the Mutant Messiah and is responsible for all sorts of time-travelling insanity, and a “pacifist” super-strong character who assembled a team to destroy the Avengers as recently as a year ago.

But they used to be friends, and this story gives them a night together to bring that friendship back to the forefront. And it is glorious.

The second story pairs Captain America with the now-vampirized Jubilee, as they go to find an undersea U-Boat filled with Nazi vampires.

Nazi. Vampires.

There’s a bit of meta story here as Jubilee wonders if Cap brought her along to serve as an example to the former Reich soldiers, or if he brought her along so they could serve as an example to her. But the real truth is that it’s a story about two heroes fighting Nazi Vampires, and what on Earth could be bad about that?

Ultimate_Comics_Spider-Man_Vol_2_27Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man #27
So, the Ultimate Comics version of Taskmaster sure seems a lot more like Bishop or Sebastian Shaw, which means that Spider-Woman and Spider-Man are a little bit out of their depth in this battle – at least until Bombshell comes back, and Cloak and Dagger come in to help out.

Ok. That’s the entire comic.

No, seriously. That’s it. And it really disappoints me.

Look, I really like Miles. I like the Ultimate version of Jessica Drew for all of the issues in her head. I even think I like the Ultimate version of Cloak and Dagger. So, this is a team that I find interesting – in theory. But this issue is almost completely devoid of Bendis’ trademark dialogue and wit. It’s a big slugfest, and one that was not terribly compellingly illustrated (despite my overall love for Pichelli’s art.)

So, this one here is really not my favorite issue of Ultimate Comics Spider-Man. It’s far from the worst comic on the market, but considering how much I usually enjoy this title, I’m awfully disappointed.

Wolverine_and_the_X-Men_Vol_1_36Wolverine and the X-Men #36 “Battle of the Atom Chapter 5”
At risk of sounding like a broken record, “Battle of the Atom” remains poised to become one of the three best story arcs in X-Men history.

Ever.

I don’t generally read Jason Aaron’s Wolverine and the X-Men, but I decided I would buy both issues that tied in to this storyline, and I am glad I did (although I still didn’t care for the art in this issue). As things have gone along with my prediction, the future X-Men are now quite as trustworthy as we might have wanted to believe, and the original team kids are finding themselves in over their heads as their older incarnations (both of them) scheme to get them sent back to the past.

There isn’t a lot more I can say without seriously revealing spoilers, but I will say that the psychic battle between Jean/Xorn and Jean, Emma and the Cuckoos is a lot of fun, and seeing the tension between the Jean Grey School X-Men and Scott’s merry band of mutant misfits remains great. The barbs that are traded between Ororo and present-Scott are particularly nice, and the contempt that future-Beast has for present-Beast is awesome.

I would also like to say that I still hate Deadpool.

There’s only one thing that really bothers me about this issue is Wolverine’s line about “wondering why they aren’t still friends.” I’ll confess that I avoided the X-Men for pretty much everything from 1995 until 2012, but was there ever a time that Logan and Scott were friends? Allies? Sure. Family even? Maybe. But friends? Logan, or Scott, would easily take a bullet for the other. (Or death beam. Or whatever.) But I don’t think the two men have ever been something that could be described as friends.

Meanwhile, Avengers #20 continues the “Infinity” storyline with Captain America preparing to surrender and a revelation about Ex Nilho and Void that would have mattered more if I had ever cared about these characters, Green Lantern #23.4: Sinestro #1 provides a totally unneeded rehash of Sinestro’s origin and makes me wish I’d stuck by my promise not to buy any more of the Villains Month titles, Guardians of the Galaxy #6 effectively Mary Sue’s Angela as she fights most of the Guardians to a standstill and the Watcher tells us that we’re screwed, Uncanny Avengers #12 has the Apocalypse Twins outwit Kang and convince Wanda to use Wonder Man’s power to move the mutants off of Earth, and Young Avengers #10 gives us some witty repartee between Mother and Loki and sets Teddy up to be completely decimated.

Thoughts? Disagreements? Want to offer up ideas on what books you’re reading this week? Let us know in the comments!

Weekly Comic Round-Up, September 11, 2013 Edition

by Aaron Einhorn
Welcome back! If you’ve followed me here from Comic Hero News, or going even farther back to Underneath My Mask, than you probably remember that one of the regular features I had was a review of the comics I’m reading that week. Full disclosure: This is not everything I read, and it’s not everything that hit the stands this week. It is, however, the books I feel merit being talked about, either because they were awesome or because there was something really, really wrong with them.

So, here we go. What came home with me from The Laughing Ogre? Read on.

astrocity4_c01Astro City #4 “On the Sidelines”
There are a few things that you can safely skip mentioning when talking about comics. You hardly need to say that “The Hulk is strong,” or that “Reed Richards is smart,” or that “Bruce Wayne is rich.”

In that vein? It’s almost beside the point to say that any particular issue of Astro City is good. It’s not that the series has been perfect (as it has evolved from publisher to publisher), but overall, Busiek, Anderson and Ross have managed to create an extraordinary world of supers by focusing on the human inside the superhuman. This latest issue focuses on a middle-aged telekinetic, but she isn’t a superhero, nor is she a supervillain. She mainly works in film, providing special effects work. She’s not alone – there are any number of superpowered individuals who just aren’t wired for hero work, but who also aren’t dishonest enough to become villains. These “sideliners” have an informal network, keeping in touch with one another and helping each other out.

Of course, this wouldn’t be much of a superhero comic if all it ever dealt with was their personal lives, so sure enough, an idiotic supervillain-wannabe tries to coerced the sideliners to work for him. With predictable results.

As always, this gets my strongest endorsement. There aren’t many books out there that are more worth your purchasing dollar than Astro City.

mongul_c01Earth-2-15-2-Solomon-Grundy-0Earth 2: Solomon Grundy #15.2 and Green Lantern: Mongul #23.2
You may recall that last week, I had some kind things to say about Forever Evil, the “cornerstone” book of DC’s entire Villains Month. I stand by that statement.

That said? Don’t waste your money on the individual titles. At $3.99 (thanks to their 3-D covers), these books are already overpriced. They insult the creative teams by not including their names on the covers. And the biggest offender? They’re almost entirely pointless.

I tried Desaad and Relic last week, and in both cases, was underwhelmed but not offended. They filled in some back story elements for the characters, and it was story that for the most part, we hadn’t seen yet.

To be fair, that’s true here as well. But by the time I had finished reading them, I realized that while it may have been new, it was entirely pointless. Did I need to see Solomon Grundy’s first incarnation, complete with “let’s rape the main character’s wife and have her commit suicide to give him pathos”? No. I knew everything I needed to about the New 52 Solomon Grundy from reading Earth 2. Similarly, watching Mongul destroy a civilization and kill a hapless admiral established him and Warworld as a threat – but that had long been established in the pages of Green Lantern.

I was expecting these titles to advance the ongoing story of their parent titles. I wasn’t expecting the Villains Month books to just rehash a backstory. I’m disgusted that DC has gotten as much money out of me for these books as they have, and really don’t intend to give them any more.

mightyavengers1_c01Mighty Avengers #1
I was a big fan of the original run of Mighty Avengers, and I’ve always been a fan of Luke Cage and his team of heroes. The down-to-Earth nature of Cage, compared to the more “big picture” views of many of the other Avengers, has always been a nice contrast. So, I was really excited for this book.

Sadly, what I got was fairly disappointing. Doctor Spider-Octopus has been entertaining to read in his own book, but in a crossover title, he’s just an ass. Cage was uncharacteristically slow to respond to Spidey’s accusation about being “mercenary,” and the actions of White Tiger and Power Man were just abrupt and cold.

It was great to see Monica Rambeau/Spectrum again – I enjoyed her brief appearance in Captain Marvel, and I have long been eager to see Marvel do more with her, but I also thought she was acting out of character. And I neither know nor care who the new Ronin is, which is a major failing for the primary mystery in the first issue of a series.

Perhaps I’ll enjoy the comic more once it moves away from Infinity, but I don’t know if my desire to send Marvel the message that, yes, books with heroes who are of color can sell, can win out against my “But it’s not very good right now, why spend the money?” desire.

XMen_BattleOfTheAtom_XMen_5_CoverX-Men #5
The third chapter of “Battle of the Atom” is here, and I’m happy to report that Brian Wood and company deliver. This meshes seamlessly with the last two installments, and I am loving seeing where this story goes. Young Scott and Jean are on the run, hijacking a Blackbird and fleeing from both the future X-Men (including a very scary vision of Xavier’s grandson and an older Jean), and the current team.

The X-Men being who they are, of course there is dissent among the team about what should happen to Scott, Jean, Hank, Bobby and Warren, and we see that as Kitty and Rachel express their… displeasure with seeing how their teammates are treating the kids.

Ultimately, Jean realizes that they will need allies to protect them from their fellow mutants, and she reaches out to a rather unlikely group of mutants to assist. The final panel wasn’t completely unexpected, but it still left me eager to see what will happen next. And that’s ok. There’s nothing wrong with a story that can take you down a familiar road if you’re enjoying the trip.

“Battle of the Atom” rages on next week, and I’ll be happy to pick it up. I hope that this gets collected as a single trade, instead of having the issues appear in the trades of their respective titles. Because if it does? This could sit proudly next to “Days of Future Past” or “The Phoenix Saga” as being among my favorite X-Men arcs.

Meanwhile, Avengers #19 shows us a little bit more about what is happening to Carol Danvers and company among the Builders, and also sets the alliance up for betrayal, Avengers Arena #15 has the teens take down Bloodstone, while one (possibly two) of the youngsters join the ranks of the dead, Indestructible Hulk #13 takes the time-traveling Hulk into Camelot to defeat the next chrono-thief, Infinity: The Hunt #1 ties in to Avengers Arena as the Avengers Academy, Jean Grey School, Braddock School and other schools for superpowered teens come together for a contest, while Atlantis is devastated by Thanos’ forces, and Ultimate Comics Ultimates #30 brings an end to Reed Richards, the Hulk and “Kang”’s reign of terror in a rather unsatisfying whimper that sets us up for Hunger.

Thoughts? Disagreements? Want to offer up ideas on what books you’re reading this week? Let us know in the comments!

Weekly Comic Round-Up, September 4, 2013 Edition

by Aaron Einhorn
Welcome back! If you’ve followed me here from Comic Hero News, or going even farther back to Underneath My Mask, than you probably remember that one of the regular features I had was a review of the comics I’m reading that week. Full disclosure: This is not everything I read, and it’s not everything that hit the stands this week. It is, however, the books I feel merit being talked about, either because they were awesome or because there was something really, really wrong with them.

So, here we go. What came home with me from The Laughing Ogre? Read on.

battleofatom1_c01X-Men: Battle of the Atom #1
All-New X-Men #16
We’re going to handle these as a Two-For-One deal here, especially since both were written (at least in part) by Brian Michael Bendis. Even while the majority of the Marvel Universe (including several members of the X-Men) are dealing with the effect of Infinity, the X-Men find themselves in the middle of yet-another time-travelling story crossover. Time-travel has been a staple of the X-Men’s comics ever since “Days of Future Past”, so the idea of a time-travel story on its own merits doesn’t bother me. After all, one of the X-Men books I regularly read is all about the original X-Men brought into modern times.

What we have here is a team of X-Men from the future, including the Beast, Charles Xavier’s grandson, Deadpool and Iceman, arriving in the present and demanding that the original X-Men return to their proper time, have their memories of their jaunt into the modern day erased from their heads, and live out their fates. Considering that this demand comes on the heels of young Cyclops almost dying, and the teams then seeing present-day-Cyclops almost get erased from reality, it’s not an unreasonable demand.

All-New_X-Men_Vol_1_16Except of course for the fact that Jean knows that this is a death sentence to her, so when the future X-Men are found to be blocking her telepathy, she creates a stunt and flees, getting Scott to join her. And so a manhunt for Jean and Cyclops begins.
It’s a crazy little jaunt of time travel, and I’m sure it will only get crazier over the upcoming parts, and sure, it’s a blatant money grab since it’s going to cause me to buy two issues of Wolverine and the X-Men, a title I don’t normally buy, but it’s a pretty fun story so far.

fevil_cv1_var_aForever Evil #1
If you’re reading the other articles on this site, you know exactly how disenchanted I have become with DC’s New 52 universe. Still, for all that, I went ahead and picked up this issue and I’m glad I did. I don’t know that I’ll read anything else from “Villains Month,” but this issue from Geoff Johns reminded me why this man revitalized Green Lantern and Flash. I don’t know a lot of the various backstories for the villains we’re seeing here – I have no idea how the Rogues got outright super-abilities of their own, how Lex Luthor was “framed” and then had his name cleared, why Ted Kord is a schlub and not the Blue Beetle, or who half the villains in the center spread are.
I also don’t care. Because this is still a tightly enough told story that I was able to follow along. The characters were close enough to being the versions of themselves I recognized. And most importantly? It featured the Crime Syndicate.

I’ve always had a soft spot for Ultraman, Owlman and Superwoman, along with whichever alternate versions they have with them this time around (in this case, it’s Johnny Quick, Power Ring, Deathstorm and Atomica). So, seeing them back in the New 52? Well, it makes me happy. Almost happy enough to be considering adding Ultraman to my costuming line-up.
Like I said, will I add more of this story to my collection? I dunno. But this issue was worth grabbing, for me at least.

superiorspiderman17_c01Superior Spider-Man #17
Sadly, after what has generally been an excellent run of issues, in this issue Dan Slott and company have stumbled. It’s not that there’s anything bad in here, exactly. The main story focusing on Otto Parker, I mean Peter Octavius, I mean Otto-Octavius-in-Peter-Parker’s-body and his ongoing issues with Tiberius Stone and what’s happening at Horizon is fine, the continuation of the Goblin subplot with Phil Urich in his role as the Green Goblin’s Goblin Knight remains intriguing, and the story of how Miguel O’Hare/Spider-Man 2099 end up being sent to the present works just fine.

But that’s just it. It’s all just “fine.” The entire issue feels like the opening moves of a chess game. It’s putting pieces into place, but they aren’t actually doing much of anything. It’s a very unexciting issue, for all that there is plenty of costumed character sightings (although there aren’t any super battles to speak of).

I’m interested to see next issue, and to see what the fall-out between Spider-Ock and Spider-Man 2099 ends up being, but this issue on its own? Very “meh.”

Meanwhile, Earth-2: Desaad #15.1 gives us a bit about how Darkseid’s chief torturer ended up on Earth, Green Lantern: Relic #23.1 explains that the enemy of all of the ring-slingers originates from another reality which also harnessed the emotional spectrum, only to ultimately drain it completely, and in Infinity #2, Thanos sends his forces to do battle with the Earth as he hunts for the Infinity Gems, and reveals a special gambit designed to force the Inhumans to give up the most important prize…

Thoughts? Disagreements? Want to offer up ideas on what books you’re reading this week? Let us know in the comments!

Weekly Comic Round-Up, August 14, 2013 Edition

by Aaron Einhorn
Welcome back! If you’ve followed me here from Comic Hero News, or going even farther back to Underneath My Mask, than you probably remember that one of the regular features I had was a review of the comics I’m reading that week. Full disclosure: This is not everything I read, and it’s not everything that hit the stands this week. It is, however, the books I feel merit being talked about, either because they were awesome or because there was something really, really wrong with them.

So, here we go. What came home with me from The Laughing Ogre? Read on.

astrocity_3Astro City #3: “Mistakes”
Kurt Busiek and Brent Anderson have been doing something remarkable with Astro City ever since the very first issue. To this day, the first story in Astro City tugs my heartstrings and has made the Samaritan one of my favorite Superman pastiches. So, was I worried to see the book moving to the Vertigo imprint? No, not really, but I did wonder where it was going to go. This issue is the second issue focusing on Marella Cowper, a customer service representative for the Honor Guard. The first issue showed how she inadvertently caused a massive war and battle in a small South American village, and this issue shows us how she tries to fix it.

As always, Astro City is about the human element to the superhuman tales, and as is not uncommon, our POV character is not one of the heroes, but an ordinary person caught up in the extraordinary. It should go without saying that this is an issue you would be well served by picking up.

avengersarena_13Avengers Arena #13
I was a huge fan of Avengers Academy, and so despite being unthrilled with the premise behind Avengers Arena, as the “spiritual successor” to that comic, I was committed to giving Arena a chance. I’m glad I did.

In this issue, Hank Pym and Tigra, the headmaster and headmistress of Avengers Academy, start trying to track down the missing students, based on a hunch provided by Molly of the runaways. We don’t actually get to see anything involving the Arena, but we do get a really strong investigative story as Pym consults with Captain Britain, Wolverine, S.H.I.E.L.D. and the parents of several of the “missing” kids, and we get to see just how well Arcade has covered his tracks.

It’s still a question what Arcade’s master plan is, but from this issue it’s clear that he does have one. Very solid read from Christos Gage and Karl Moline.

infinity_1Infinity #1
Marvel kicks off their latest “big event” with the return of Thanos, mysterious forces threatening the galaxy, and a cast that dwarfs most of the “event” crossovers.

I have to say that, as event comics go, this one is both grander and smaller in scope than many. Anytime Thanos appears it is something to take note of, but this book seems to be mostly contained to the Avengers titles. Considering that Jonathan Hickman is writing this title as well as Avengers, that makes sense – but it also makes me feel like this could have been restricted to an inter-title crossover.

Nonetheless, we actually get something kind of interesting here, and it helps justify some of the weirder character choices (Starbrand, Smasher, Hyperion) that we’ve been seeing in Avengers start to get used in the pages of Infinity.

Word has it that Infinity will also cover some of the ways that the timeline and continuity have been “broken” by some of the previous cross-title events, so I’ll stick around for that if nothing else.

In other words, the first issue of Infinity didn’t leave me overwhelmed, but it also didn’t leave me annoyed about spending $4.99 for the title.

thunderagents1T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents #1
I was just a young lad the first time I came across Wally Wood’s T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents. At the time, the license was owned by First Comics, and in the intervening years, it’s moved around quite a bit, including a recent stint at DC Comics where Nick Spencer brought a new version of the agents to the modern era.

Somehow (I’ve missed the drama surrounding how), the license has moved to IDW, and Phil Hester and Andrea Di Vito have brought us a new version of the team. The comic seems to be taking place in contemporary times, but starting with a relatively young team of agents. Thunder and NoMan are a part of the team, facing off against Iron Maiden, and the issue begins with the Maiden having defeated Lightning, destroying NoMan’s body, and taking the Invisibility Cloak (again) and THUNDER (they aren’t bothering with the acronym’s periods within the pages of the book, so while should I?) forced to come to a new solution. That solution is the Thunderbelt, which will end up being worn by Len Brown. In this story, Brown is an ex-hockey player who has been serving as an oddly scrupulous leg-breaker for the local mob. Brown isn’t very smart, but he seems to be loyal and brave, and all but immune to pain, so he’s the perfect candidate for the belt.

We don’t get a chance to see the new Dynamo in action, much less see his initial encounter with Iron Maiden (which will, no doubt, turn romantic), so this very much feels like a “Part One” instead of a stand alone comic. I kind of miss the era when most issues of a comic told a complete story, but hey, I’m so happy to see T.H.U.N.D.E.R. back that I can’t possibly be an unbiased critic here. This isn’t the best version of the Agents I’ve seen, but hopefully it’ll be a more long-lived one than DC’s recent offerings. I know I’ll be buying the next issue.

uncannyxmen10Uncanny X-Men #10
Scott Summers and his team of X-Men (currently consisting of himself, Emma Frost, Magneto, Magik, the Stepford Cuckoos, a very young Warren Worthington III and several brand new mutants) are having an interesting time of it. While Summers himself is still wanted for the murder of Charles Xavier, he and his team are doing their best to find new mutants, save them from persecution, teach them how to use their abilities, and occasionally save the world.

Against this backdrop, Magneto may or may not be collaborating with Maria Hill and the new Mutant Liaison for S.H.I.E.L.D., Alison Blair, and the other heroes of the world, especially the Avengers, may still be trying to stop them.

I don’t know if I know who this version of Cyclops is. He isn’t the idealist I grew up with, he isn’t the militant I found myself puzzled by, but he’s an interesting guy.

Not a lot of action occurs in this issue, it’s more of a set-up issue for the return of the Sentinels next issue, prompted by Scott and team appearing at a pro-mutant rally in Ann Arbor, but it’s still a good character read. For people looking to jump in on Uncanny X-Men, this issue might not be a bad starting point.

Meanwhile, Green Lantern Corps #23 reveals the mysterious reason that the rings have been failing as we discover a threat to all of the major entities, Secret Avengers #7 has the attempt to assassinate the Supreme Scientist fail, Daisy get fired from S.H.I.E.L.D., and Mockingbird get abandoned, Ultimate Comics: X-Men #30 has an all-out war begin between Kitty Pryde’s Utopia and Jean Grey’s Tian, and in World’s Finest #15, Power Girl and Huntress face off against the New 52’s version of Desaad.

Thoughts? Disagreements? Want to offer up ideas on what books you’re reading this week? Let us know in the comments!

Weekly Comic Round-Up, July 17, 2013 Edition

Welcome back! If you’ve followed me here from Comic Hero News, or going even farther back to Underneath My Mask, than you probably remember that one of the regular features I had was a review of the comics I’m reading that week. Full disclosure: This is not everything I read, and it’s not everything that hit the stands this week. It is, however, the books I feel merit being talked about, either because they were awesome or because there was something really, really wrong with them.

So, here we go. What came home with me from The Laughing Ogre? Read on.

all_new_xmen_14_c01All-New X-Men #14
Brian Michael Bendis has done something really remarkable here. In a world where Jean Grey is dead, Hank McCoy is dour and depressed, Ice Man is a grotesque monstrosity and Cyclops is Magneto, he’s given us a world with the original X-Men.

This week’s chapter has the newly-discovering-she’s-a-telepath Jean Grey scaring the beejezus out of her team by pretending to go all Dark Phoenix on them, in an attempt to scare off Mystique, Lady Mastermind and Sabretooth who are busy trying to buy Madripoor.

This is the X-Men the way we like ’em. Serious stories, but light-hearted and fun. Bendis has really caught what made these characters enjoyable, and if you’re only reading one X-Men book, make it this one.

batman_66_c01Batman ’66 #1
Something that will quickly become apparent if you stick around here – I am not a fan of The New 52. I’m not a fan of dark, gritty stories. I want heroes to be heroic and inspire me to want to be a better person. The 1966 Batman television show was, perhaps, a little too light-hearted and camp, but it was still fun. So, if nothing else, I wanted to send DC Comics that fans of their older stuff are still around, so I picked this up. And I’m glad I did. It’s an utterly light and silly Riddler tale with a guest appearance by Catwoman. Will it change your life? Absolutely not. It’s entirely as easy to consume as an episode of the television show.

But then, that’s what we paid for. The cover tells us what we’re getting, and Jeff Parker and Jonathan Case delivered.

batwoman_22_c01Batwoman #22
One of the few books I’ve been completely happy with since the New 52 has been Batwoman. I wasn’t sure about seeing JH Williams III move from artist to writer, but the book has seemlessly picked up from where the Detective Comics run with Williams and Greg Rucka left off.

This issue gave us a whole lot of Bette/Flamebird, preparing to attack the DEO with help from the Colonel, all in an effort to “free” Kate. Meanwhile, Kate is hitting up villains to figure out how best to defeat Batman.

I don’t really want to see Batman enter Kate’s title. It can’t go well for her, and that weakens her character in my opinion. But if it’s going to happen, this seems to be the best way to manage it.

thunderbolts_13_c01Thunderbolts #13
I’ve picked up Thunderbolts ever since the very beginning, regardless of what Marvel has done with the title. This current team of ‘bolts, led by Red Hulk/General Ross and featuring Venom (Flash Thompson), the Punisher, Deadpool and Elektra, with the Red Leader and now Mercy has little relationship to the original concept, but that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been fun.

That said, I’m kind of glad to see a change of the artistic team on the title.

This issue wasn’t really about the team – it was really the origin of Mercy and how she ended up on the team. But that story was creepy enough, and I eagerly look forward to seeing what the team’s next mission ends up being.

ultimate_comics_spiderman_25_c01Ultimate Comics: Spider-Man #25
There’s a lot of controversy over whether or not Miles needed an “Uncle Ben” moment, but in any case he had one. Two issues ago, Miles lost his mother, and New York lost their Spider-Man. Again.

It’s taken three issues and a lot of badgering by the people in Miles’ life, but finally we get him moving and agreeing to be the hero he was born to be. And from the looks of things, this is where we will begin seeing a lot more of Gwen Stacy, Aunt May and Jessica Drew.

We’ve also got a Miles who is growing a little bit older, and that’s not a bad thing either.

This is another Brian Michael Bendis book, and it also has me hook, line and sinker. But then, I’m a sucker for Miles.

what-if-avx-2_c01What If… A vs. X #2
What If… has always been Marvel’s escape valve. The real secret about major comics events is that, at the end of the day, the status will remain quo. It kind of has to. But in What If…? All bets are off.

We know that the world won’t be destroyed in A vs. X.

We have no such assurances here.

That’s not to say this is perfect. Much like the original A vs. X, the pacing flies by too fast, and some characters are too broadly painted. Magneto, for instance, is just this side of growing a long mustache to twirl. There are also some weird continuity issues. I’m pretty sure that the modern Nova wasn’t a part of A vs. X. Still, it’s worth checking this out.

Meanwhile, in A + X #10, Fantomex and Black Widow almost team up to steal a McGuffin while Scarlet Witch and Domino team up their probability powers to stop a Celestial Roomba from destroying the planet, Avengers #16 continues to be an incomprehensible mess with lots of powerful superhumans coming together to stop something, Batman Beyond Unlimited #18 introduces us to Batgirl Beyond while Terry and the Metal Men save Gotham, and Green Lantern New Guardians #22 has Kyle get abducted by Relic who uses Kyle’s ring power to learn all he needs to about this universe he wants to destroy.

Thoughts? Disagreements? Want to offer up ideas on what books you’re reading this week? Let us know in the comments!